Drumming and Dancing

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Re: Drumming and Dancing

Postby drtom » Fri Jul 10, 2020 2:56 am

Siete Leguas wrote:I also agree on the close relationship between drums and dance. To me, the joy of drumming has come hand in hand with the joy of dancing. Although I was never particularly good at it, it has naturally become something that I need to do regularly.


I too have little talent (for drumming as well, to be truthful), which may explain to some extent at least my profound admiration.

A relevant memory of mine you may find interesting is of a teaching technique in which the student steps through the rhythm she's learning.
Last edited by drtom on Fri Jul 10, 2020 3:32 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Drumming and Dancing

Postby Thomas Altmann » Fri Jul 10, 2020 9:05 am

I am dancing secretly, either when nobody is watching, or in my mind, while I'm playing. I think it's better that way - for witnessing dancers as well as for myself.

Jazz critic and author Whitney Balliett once said: "A great drummer dances sitting down. A great tap dancer drums standing up." Although he referred to the late tap dancer Baby Laurence, I suggest that as drummers, we should rather take the first half of his statement to heart.

Many musicians, not only drummers, are or were tap dancers, among them Tito Puente and Cachao. Conga technique and tap technique have at least one feature in common: the heel-tip combination. Sand dance, by the way, is said to be interrelated with brush playing in jazz drumming.

If we look at folklore musicians, like in Cuba for example, we will find that almost everybody can as well sing, dance and drum, at least a little, no matter what his actual profession is.

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Re: Drumming and Dancing

Postby Chtimulato » Fri Jul 10, 2020 10:35 am

Jazz critic and author Whitney Balliett once said: "A great drummer dances sitting down. A great tap dancer drums standing up." Although he referred to the late tap dancer Baby Laurence, I suggest that as drummers, we should rather take the first half of his statement to heart.


Of course. It's allways been obvious to me. This means you are really feeling (and grooving) what you're playing. Assuming you're playing some kind of music you like, and not something you are only paid for.

Conga technique and tap technique have at least one feature in common: the heel-tip combination. Sand dance, by the way, is said to be interrelated with brush playing in jazz drumming.


Nice statement.
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Re: Drumming and Dancing

Postby drtom » Fri Jul 10, 2020 2:17 pm

Thomas Altmann wrote:Conga technique and tap technique have at least one feature in common: the heel-tip combination. Sand dance, by the way, is said to be interrelated with brush playing in jazz drumming.


Great analogies.
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